InSITE 2019: Informing Science + IT Education Conferences: Jerusalem

Jun 30 - Jul 5 2019, Jerusalem, Israel 

Locale Information

Language.  English, Arabic, and of course Hebrew are spoken in all tourist areas.

Climate.  In general Israel has a Mediterranean climate, but the temperature varies by elevation.  We recommend checking the weather forecast for the cities you will be in.  In general, there is no rain in the summer. The days are very hot and the evenings/ nights range between warm and cool depending on elevation (Jerusalem is cool, Tel-Aviv is warm and humid).Israeli Outlet

Electricity.  220/240 volts at 50 Hz. The sockets nowadays are "H" type plugs that can accommodate type "C" plugs common to much of Europe. When in doubt, bring plug adapters.

Currency. Israel uses the New Israeli Shekel (NIS). There are coins for 1, 2, 5, and 10 NIS and notes for 20, 50, 100 and 200 NIS. Coins are issued 10 and 50 Agorot (cents). (100 Agorot to a NIS.)  Currently 1 NIS is worth about $0.28.

We recommend that you use a credit card that doesn't charge a foreign transaction fee and withdraw cash from ATM using a debit card. (Our debit card reimburses for ATM fees.)  We always get cash from the ATM machine at the airport when we first arrive. But there are ATMs near all hotels (and most other places).

Currency can be exchanged at banks and currency exchangers for a fee.

Travelers' checks can be used at any post office and Western Union office.  Few businesses accept them in payment.

Clothing.  Since you will be visiting places that expect modest dress, bring along long pants and shirt/blouse that covers your arms. If you visit Jewish holy sites, you will be expected to cover your head out of respect. Moslem holy sites are expect you to wear long or short sleeve, not cut offs. Typically head coverings will be offered you at Jewish sites. Wear short or long sleeve blouses and shirts and not sleeveless, particularly at the conference venue.

Gratuities. Tipping in Israeli restaurants and cafes is between 10-12% depending on how pleased (or not) you are with the service.  If you take a tour, tip the driver 10 NIS and the guide 15 NIS.

The Sabbath in Jerusalem. Friday night to Saturday night in the Jewish areas of Jerusalem is peaceful. It is a special time when families take walks and non-religious families visit other parts of the country. While public transportation is closed, your hotel can help you find a taxi. Most stores and all kosher restaurants are closed, but others are open. You may wish to use this time to visit the Old City's Arab quarter, rest, visit friends, or, if you plan ahead, tour other parts of the country.  See https://www.touristisrael.com/shabbat-in-jerusalem/11023/ for more information.

Some of the Many Must-See Attractions in Jerusalem. The Old City, The Israel Museum, Machane Yehudah Market, Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum. We also enjoy the Biblical Zoo, the Chagall windows in the synogogue at Hadassah Medical Campus in Ein Kerem neighborhood, the City of David archaeological site with remains of Jerusalem during the First Temple and Second Temple Period.  Some will want to visit Bethany, a Second Temple period settlement located on the slopes of the Mount of Olives, about two miles from Jerusalem. According to Christian tradition Elazar (Lazarus) and his sisters Martha and Mary lived here.  Families with kids will enjoy the Time elevator.  It uses motion based seating, panoramic screens, special effects carefully synchronized to the action of the film.  This gives you the sensation of viewing the movie as a participant rather than a spectator.

Israeli Street Food.  Street food is safe, nutritious, and tasty.

  • Falafel consists of falafel balls served in pita bread with pickles, salad, and tehina.  Falafel balls are made from chickpeas.
  • Shawarma is often made from turkey and served in pita bread.  If you prefer more meat, request it without chips (French fries) or salad.
  • Sabih is pita bread with fried eggplant, egg, salad, techina, and pickles.

Prices.  The prices in Jerusalem are closer to that of New York than Ho Chi Minh City.  Expect to pay at least $15 for a modest meal.

 

 

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